Error loading Razor Script DynamicNav2.cshtml
The method or operation is not implemented.

Water

 

For a full list water restricitions and penalties go to www.chw.net.au or phone 5320 3100  For more information contact the Water Restrictions InfoLine on 1800 044 636.

Harnessing Ballarat’s Stormwater 

Stormwater is water that runs off hard surfaces such as footpaths, roads and roofs when it rains. Stormwater becomes polluted with litter, nutrients, oil and sediment as it travels over these surfaces, through a system of pipes and channels and directly into local creeks and rivers. Most of Ballarat’s stormwater flows into the Yarrowee River, then into the Leigh River, the Barwon River, and finally into Bass Strait at Barwon Heads. The polluted water threatens the plants and animals in these sensitive environments.

The urbanisation of Ballarat has created a need for more water and at the same time has created more stormwater runoff to our drains, creeks, lakes and rivers. The increase in storm flows within our waterways has resulted in scouring and erosion and loss of habitat. Harnessing stormwater can provide a valuable resource and improve waterway health.



What is the Stormwater Management Plan (SWMP)?

Ballarat’s Storm Water Management Plan was orginally prepared in 2002 to meet the standards of the State Environmental Protection Policy 'Waters of Victoria'. The Plan was updated in June 2010 and identifies values to be protected in Ballarat’s waterways. It outlines measures to improve the quality of urban stormwater entering our creeks and rivers and promotes best practice stormwater management in Ballarat.

Broad Objectives of the SWMP

  • Stormwater quality improvement
  • Protection of environmental values of aquatic and riparian ecosystems
  • Integration into urban planning, design, landscape and municipal operations
  • Support for stormwater reuse, where appropriate
  • Management of Stormwater drainage and flood mitigation


Key Objectives and Priority Actions in the SWMP relate to:

  • Stormwater quality improvement
  • Protection of environmental values of aquatic and riparian ecosystems
  • Integration into urban planning, design and operations
  • Stormwater reuse
  • Stormwater drainage and flood mitigation 


The Harnessing Ballarat’s Stormwater Project.

The Harnessing Ballarat’s Stormwater Project was a joint proposal between the Committee for Ballarat and the City of Ballarat to harvest and re-use urban stormwater from Ballarat’s existing and emerging built up areas.

The HBSW Project:

  • added value to the pioneering Lake Wendouree Water Supply Project completed in 2008; 
  • provides a highly visible storm water harvesting and re-use scheme that has been accepted as a core means of irrigating Ballarat’s premier open space assets and sustaining Lake Wendouree as an aquatic sports and tourism venue;.
  • delivered the core infrastructure to harvest, store and transfer non potable water which can be augmented through additional distribution systems and as further urbanisation of the catchments yield additional harvested water;
  •    highlights a significant investment in alternative water supplies for our Lake, gardens and sporting venues and provides surety in the face of a changing climate that we can maintain Ballarat’s liveability.

 

Watch the Harnessing Ballarat's Stormwater Project Video 

  

The delivery system is expected to offset approximately 189 ML per year of potable water in and around Ballarat. This infrastructure safe guards the various assets that require water for irrigation purposes.

The Project was made possible through the significant funding received from the Australian Government’s Water for the Future initiative, Regional Development Victoria, Sport and Recreation Victoria and the City of Ballarat. Total funding for the project was $3.5m; the overall project was delivered over a three year period from 2010. Download the Report for further information. 



Protect our waterways - 
Tips for Cleaner Stormwater.

You can help protect our waterways and make a difference to the communities, plants and animals which live downstream.

  1. Bin all your litter and secure rubbish in bins and on trailers.
      
  2. Clean up after your pets and place the droppings in your bin or compost.
      
  3. Sweep up grass clippings and leaves, and use them in your compost. Sweep paths and gutters and place rubbish in the bin.
      
  4. Avoid using pesticides, herbicides or fertilisers where they could wash from your garden, into the drain. Do not use when windy or raining.
      
  5. Take care when building or landscaping. Ensure stockpiles of soil or sand are covered, and will not wash into the drainage system.
      
  6. Dispose of chemical, oil and paint containers at household chemical collection sites.
       
  7. Clean carefully and dispose of dirty water onto your garden or down the toilet, not in the gutter or down the drain.
      
  8. Wash your car on a grassed area, or use a carwash which recycles its water.
      
  9. Maintain your car to prevent oil and fluid leaks onto the road.
      
  10. Clean up spills using dry material such as paper, sand or sawdust. Never hose spills down the drain.
      
  11. Specialist stormwater advice is available for industries including cleaners, concreters, mobile cleaning businesses, painters, construction industry, auto repairs and commercial centres.

 

 


Saving WaterTop of document.

Of the water delivered for use by Central Highlands Water, 70% is used for residential use and the other 30% for commercial purposes. Therefore, the savings we can make in our daily lives really does make a difference.


Saving Water in the Bathroom

  • Water efficient showerheads - in Victoria, 29% of the water we use inside the house is used in the shower. That's a lot, but that means it is also an area where we can save enormous amounts of water. Old showerheads can use up to 18 litres per minute, while the new efficient shower devices use only nine litres per minute. This all adds up when you consider a four minute shower everyday uses 26,000 litres and water efficient units uses only 13,000 litres. There is no real difference in pressure as they have been designed so that air is also forced through the outlet.
  • Don't have the thermostat set too high - adding cold water to reduce the temperature is really wasteful.
  • Tap aerators and flow restrictors - to reduce water consumption there is no need to replace your tapware. Both tap aerators and flow restrictors can be fitted to your existing tapware.
  • Flow restrictors are placed inside the tapware and reduce the amount of water which is able to flow through. They don't cost much and can be fitted yourself.
  • Always turn off the tap when brushing your teeth.
  • When shaving, half fill the sink instead of using running water.
  • Toilet - if replacing your single flush toilet is out of the question - try a cistern weight to reduce the amount of water per flush. They work by allowing the toilet to flush for the time you hold down the button.
  • Or what about placing a brick in the cistern to reduce water - basic yet effective.
  • Also check for leaks as cisterns can leak. A really easy way to do this is to place a few drops of food dye into the cistern. If coloured water appears in the toilet bowl before the toilet has been flushed you have a leak which is potentially wasting 1000's of litres of water each year.


Saving Water in the Kitchen

  • Aerators and flow restrictors can reduce water consumption by 50% and they can be fitted to your existing tapware.
  • Keep water in the fridge - this saves running the tap until the water is cool enough to drink.
  • Make sure the dishwasher is full before use.
  • When buying new appliances look for water efficient appliances - they will save you money in the long-term.
  • If you don't have a dishwasher, use your two bowl sink for rinsing dishes rather than running the tap.


Saving Water in the Laundry

  • 15-20% of the water used in the house is used in the laundry. It is a place were we consume a great deal of water, energy and chemicals.
  • Make sure you adjust your water levels according to your load in your washing machine and wait until you have a full load before use.


Saving Water Around the Home

  • A slow dripping tap can waste up to 20,000 litres a year. It could be as simple as just replacing a washer.
  • Aerators and flow restrictors can reduce water consumption by 50% and they can be fitted to your existing tapware

 

Greywater is the name used for water that is discharged from fixtures such as showers, baths and washing machines. It excludes water discharged from toilets and the kitchen.

The temporary use of greywater, particularly in times of severe water restrictions, may help sustain your garden. However, the use of greywater does have risks and it is important that appropriate care is taken with its use.

Please download Using Greywater - the essential guide to collection & use (PDF - 242KB).

When buying detergents, read the product information carefully. Choose a product which contain little or no phosphorus and is biodegradable. Choose liquid detergents rather than powders as powders have between 10-20 times more salt, which can be damaging to your soil. Use only the amount required.

If you wish to permanently use greywater there are a number of greywater treatment systems which have been approved by the EPA which maybe used. For more information visit Household greywater reuse (EPA website).


Using Greywater - Do's & Don'ts

Do

  • Do only use greywater from baths, showers, hand basins and washing machines (preferably the final rinse water).
  • Do only use greywater on the garden and rotate which areas you water.
  • Do only apply enough water that the soil can absorb.
  • Do wash your hands following watering with greywater.

Don'ts

  • Don't use greywater during wet periods.
  • Don't use greywater if odours are generated and plants do not appear to be healthy.
  • Don't water vegetable gardens if the crop is to be eaten raw.
  • Don't use greywater that has faecal contamination, for example water used to launder nappies.
  • Don't use kitchen greywater (including from dishwashers) due to the high concentration of food wastes and chemicals that are not readily broken down.
  • Don't store greywater for more than 24 hours.
  • Don't let children or pets drink or play with greywater.
  • Don't allow greywater to flow from your property or enter stormwater systems.

 

 


Stormwater ManagementTop of document.

Stormwater is water that runs off hard surfaces such as footpaths, roads and roofs when it rains. Stormwater becomes polluted with litter, nutrients, oil and sediment as it travels over these surfaces, through a system of pipes and channels and directly into local creeks and rivers. Most of Ballarats Stormwater flows into the Yarrowee River, then into the Leigh River, the Barwon River, and finally into Bass Strait at Barwon Heads. The polluted water threatens the plants and animals in these sensitive environments.

What is the Stormwater Management Plan (SWMP)?

Ballarats SWMP was prepared in 2002 to meet the standards of the State Environmental Protection Policy 'Waters of Victoria'. A number of different organisations and community groups participated in the process, including the EPA, Glenelg-Hopkins CMA, Corangamite CMA and DSE.

The Plan identifies values to be protected in Ballarats waterways, and outlines measures to improve the quality of urban Stormwater entering our creeks and rivers. It also promotes best practice Stormwater management in Ballarat.


Broad Objectives of the SWMP

  • Stormwater quality improvement
  • Protection of environmental values of aquatic and riparian ecosystems
  • Integration into urban planning, design, landscape and municipal operations
  • Support for Stormwater reuse, where appropriate
  • Management of Stormwater drainage and flood mitigation


Key Priority Actions Key actions in the SWMP relate to:

  • Land use planning
  • Municipal operations
  • Education and awareness
  • Regulation and enforcement
  • Structural treatment measures
  • Flow control measures

A number of specific actions are listed for each waterway and sub-catchment.

What can you do to protect our stormwater?

10 Tips for Cleaner Waterways

You can help protect our Stormwater and make a difference to the communities, plants and animals which live downstream.

  1. Bin all your litter and secure rubbish in bins and on trailers.
  2. Clean up after your pets and place the droppings in your bin or compost.
  3. Sweep up grass clippings and leaves, and use them in your compost. Sweep paths and gutters and place rubbish in the bin.
  4. Avoid using pesticides, herbicides or fertilisers where they could wash from your garden, into the drain. Do not use when windy or raining.
  5. Take care when building or landscaping. Ensure stockpiles of soil or sand are covered, and will not wash into the drainage system.
  6. Dispose of chemical, oil and paint containers at household chemical collection sites.
  7. Clean carefully dispose of dirty water onto your garden or down the toilet, not in the gutter or down the drain.
  8. Wash your car on a grassed area, or use a carwash which recycles its water.
  9. Maintain your car to prevent oil and fluid leaks onto the road.
  10. Clean up spills using dry material such as paper, sand or sawdust. Never hose spills down the drain.

Specialist Stormwater advice is available for industries including cleaners, concreters, mobile cleaning businesses, painters, construction industry, auto repairs and commercial centres


GET SOCIAL WITH US
Visit our YouTube ChannelYouTube Snaps of Our City On InstagramInstagram Follow Us On TwitterTwitter Like Our Facebook Page and Stay UpdatedFacebook